February Feature: Baby Arugula

Salads. On its own or mixed in with other greens, arugula makes a great salad. It can stand up to a stronger vinaigrette but is often paired with a sweeter balsamic, which balances well with its peppery notes. Its leaves are soft and chewy and pleasant in the mouth.

On pizza. If you want to jazz up a store-bought pizza, dress some arugula lightly in a lemony vinaigrette and mound onto your pizza. It’s also great on your homemade pizza, of course.

Toss into soups. If you’d like a little green in your soup, toss in a few handfuls of arugula just after you take it off the flame. You don’t want to cook the arugula, just wilt it in the broth.

Toss into pasta. Like with soups, a toss a handful of arugula into your pasta while dressing it with sauce. Or add it to the sauce, but only in the final moments of cooking.

With eggs. Sauté some arugula in butter or olive oil with a touch of garlic. When the arugula has wilted (it should only take a minute) add beaten eggs and cook until done. Arugula also makes a nice bed to serve sunny side up eggs on. Just toss it with a little vinaigrette but not too much as the egg yolk will create a nice sauce.

Sandwiches. Arugula makes a more interesting substitute for lettuce in sandwiches and is a classic green for hot sandwiches such as panini.

Grains. Arugula pairs well with hearty grains and small pastas such as farro, couscous, wild rice, and whole wheat couscous.

Roasted Vegetables. Toss warm, just out of the oven roasted vegetables with arugula before serving. Especially delicious are roasted squash, potatoes, beets, and carrots.

Pesto. A delicious substitute for the classic basil, arugula pesto is a good way to use up a surplus of arugula.

Lasagna. Use arugula instead of spinach or a combination of arugula and spinach as one of your lasagna layers. In fact, try using arugula as a spinach substitute in general when you want the tenderness of spinach but with a little more bite.

from the kitchn, one of our favorite recipe websites